Health In Harmony

Is addressing basic human needs the key to successful biodiversity conservation? Health in Harmony, a Portland-based nonprofit founded in 2005, works in Indonesia to address human health and deforestation.  Health in Harmony partners with Alam Sehat Lestari in Indonesian Borneo to provide low-cost health care to marginalized communities in exchange for a commitment to protect natural resources and reduce deforestation. In the past five years, their collaborative effort led to a 68 percent [...]

2015-09-21T09:45:09+00:00Conservation, health, Social-Ecological Seeds|Comments Off on Health In Harmony

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy

Connecting people to nature: Is development the key to longterm success in wildlife conservation? Objective: to conserve wildlife without tradeoffs to local communities The Lewa Wildlife Conservancy in Kenya (http://www.lewa.org/about-lewa/a-catalyst-model-for-community-conservation/) works as a catalyst and model for the conservation of wildlife and its habitat. It does this through the protection and management of species, the initiation and support of community conservation and development programmes, and the education of neighbouring areas [...]

2015-04-30T21:39:43+00:00Social-Ecological Seeds|Comments Off on Lewa Wildlife Conservancy

Yahara Pride Farms

Yahara Pride Farms (http://www.yaharapridefarms.org/) is a coalition of farmers, business people, environmentalists, technical experts and government employees that aims to decrease nonpoint pollution in the Yahara watershed, Madison Wisconsin. YPF engages farmers directly in changes in farm management practices to decrease nonpoint pollution. YPF is experimenting with manure digestors, cover crops, deep injection of manure into croplands, and other new and innovative nutrient management practices. The programs include monitoring to evaluate the effects of the practices.

2015-02-06T01:00:02+00:00Food, Social-Ecological Seeds|Comments Off on Yahara Pride Farms

Tribal Parks

“Tribal parks” - are an example of Aboriginal people asserting their rights to govern and use land in ways without the prior approval of a national government. In Canada, some tribal parks have been converted into co-managed national parks (e.g. Gwai Hannas national park), while other exist in an interesting legal gray area where they form partnerships with some levels of government but are not formally recognized by others (e.g. Tla-o-qui-aht Tribal Park ). These parks are interesting because they represent a way in new way in human, and historical values have been incorporated in the protection of ecosystems. They are also interesting because they have been asserted not by the state, but by colonized people who have historically been displaced by the state. By enhancing the diversity of land ownership and land governance systems these tribal parks potentially provide opportunities for experimentation and learning that can benefit broader society.

2015-02-03T12:47:20+00:00Social Seeds|Comments Off on Tribal Parks
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